• Full FrameEducation Week's Photo Blog

    Best Wire Photos of 2011

    by Nicole Fruge posted December 27, 2011

    A student walks down the street after leaving Gideons Elementary School in Atlanta. The school, where state investigators found evidence of widespread and systematic cheating on exams, will be marked as not passing muster every year since 2001. (Published in Print: November 9, 2011) —David Goldman/AP

    A woman passes behind more than 4,000 flags, meant to represent the number of pink slips issued to area teachers during a rally for teachers in San Diego on May 13. Thousands of California teachers rallied in cities throughout the state to demonstrate against the threat of deep education cuts and to appeal to lawmakers to raise tax revenue for public schools. —Gregory Bull/AP

    A woman passes behind more than 4,000 flags, meant to represent the number of pink slips issued to area teachers during a rally for teachers in San Diego on May 13. Thousands of California teachers rallied in cities throughout the state to demonstrate against the threat of deep education cuts and to appeal to lawmakers to raise tax revenue for public schools. —Gregory Bull/AP

    Students throw their teacher into the air after finishing national college-entrance exams in southwest China’s Chongqing municipality. More than 9 million high school students in China took the exams this year. In a society where many people see connections as crucial to getting ahead, the entrance exam is defended as meritocratic, giving everyone a shot at attending college. (Published in Print: June 15, 2011) —AP

    Moore Elementary School 4th-grader Nathaniel Pollard looks at a presentation given by Tony Zinstmaster, a first-responder volunteer at the scene of the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center, with his K-9 Kaiser, in Mt. Morris, Mich. Pollard's class sang patriotic songs and were shown a flag with the names of those who died in the terrorist attacks. Some teachers see the tenth anniversary as a teachable moment and have worked hard to better educate themselves and their students about issues related to the attacks and their aftermath. —Ryan Garza/The Flint Journal/AP

    Moore Elementary School 4th-grader Nathaniel Pollard looks at a presentation given by Tony Zinstmaster, a first-responder volunteer at the scene of the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center, with his K-9 Kaiser, in Mt. Morris, Mich. Pollard's class sang patriotic songs and were shown a flag with the names of those who died in the terrorist attacks. Some teachers see the tenth anniversary as a teachable moment and have worked hard to better educate themselves and their students about issues related to the attacks and their aftermath. —Ryan Garza/The Flint Journal/AP

    Police drag a protester away from the Wisconsin Assembly chamber as lawmakers prepare to vote on a collective bargaining bill. The bill became a law approved by Republican Gov. Scott Walker and the legislature’s GOP majority reduced the collective bargaining powers of teachers and many other public employees. The measure sparked major protests at the state capitol, and across Wisconsin. (Published in Print: March 16, 2011) —Scott Olson/Getty Images

    President Barack Obama greets graduating students, some overcome with emotion, before the Booker T. Washington High School graduation ceremony on May 16 in Memphis, Tenn. The school won this year's Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge. —Charles Dharapak/AP

    This bird’s-eye view shows the tornado’s extensive path of destruction through Joplin High School and its surrounding neighborhood in Joplin, Mo. At least 150 people were killed and hundreds more were injured on May 22 when a tornado cut a path of destruction through the city. Classes at all Joplin schools were canceled for the rest of the school year as officials reassessed the district’s plans for the future. (Published in Print: June 8, 2011) —GeoEye/AP

    Joplin High School wide receiver Colton Simmons uses a pick to hit a rock before their home-opener in Joplin, Mo. The tornado that swept through in May leveled five of the district’s 20 campuses in all, damaged five more, tore apart the school’s fiber network, and displaced many students. Just 87 days after the tornado touched down, the school district deployed 2,200 Apple MacBooks to all its high school students on the first day of the new school year, as the community tries to regain a sense of normalcy. —Paul Sancya/AP

    Joplin High School wide receiver Colton Simmons uses a pick to hit a rock before their home-opener in Joplin, Mo. The tornado that swept through in May leveled five of the district’s 20 campuses in all, damaged five more, tore apart the school’s fiber network, and displaced many students. Just 87 days after the tornado touched down, the school district deployed 2,200 Apple MacBooks to all its high school students on the first day of the new school year, as the community tries to regain a sense of normalcy. —Paul Sancya/AP

    Students are split into groups as they attend a Quran recitation class at an Islamic boarding school in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, on Aug. 9. Muslims around the world are observing Ramadan, the holiest month in Islamic calendar. —Binsar Bakkara/AP

    Japanese children make their way through the rubble of their earthquake-ravaged school in Minamisanriku for an open-air class on March 24. Among the thousands of victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami was Taylor Anderson, a 24-year-old Virginian who had been teaching English in the coastal city of Ishinomaki. Ms. Anderson had moved overseas with the Japan Exchange Program after graduating from Randolph-Macon College in 2008. Two fellow teachers with the program were found safe. (Published in Print: March 30, 2011) —Kyodo News/AP

    A student learns to write in a lower-primary school in Khankar village on the outskirts of Gauhati, India. At least 80 poor children study in the lower-primary school, which was set up by villagers without any government aid. —“I regret to have made all those children,” says Godelive Ndageramiwe. “If I were to start over, I would only make two or three.” She’s a 40-year-old mother of eight, with a ninth child due soon. The family homestead in a Burundi village is too small to provide enough food. Three of the children have quit school for lack of money to pay required fees. According to the U.N. Population Fund, the worldwide population topped seven billion on Oct 31. (Published in Print: October 26, 2011) —Anupam Nath/AP

    Friends of Minneapolis South High School graduate Nuradin Farah hoist him aloft after the school's commencement ceremony on June 2 at the Minneapolis Convention Center. States across the nation are bracing for drops in their high school graduation rates as the nation changes the math used by districts to measure their success. Minnesota is transitioning to the new formula this year. —Jeff Wheeler/Minneapolis Star Tribune/AP

    Bob Hurley, center, head coach of the Jersey City, N.J., St. Anthony High School boys’ basketball team, talks to his players in the locker room during halftime of a game against neighboring rival St. Mary’s on Feb. 2. St. Anthony won the game, giving Mr. Hurley victory No. 1,000 of his coaching career. (Published in Print: February 9, 2011) —Julio Cortez/AP

    Students from the Broome Street Academy, a New York City charter school, listen to protester Julio Rolon of Coamo, Puerto Rico, speak out against the process known as hydrofracking at Occupy Wall Street headquarters at Zuccotti Park on Oct. 11. The students are assigned to write a report on the protest. —Kathy Willens/AP

    Alexander Hwee, 6, left, huddles with classmates under a desk at Ansgar Larsen Elementary School in Oxnard, Calif., last week. Hundreds of California schools, businesses, and municipalities participated in the state’s annualearthquake-preparedness drill. (Published in Print: October 26, 2011) —Anthony Plascencia/Ventura County Star/AP

    Seventh graders inspect a human brain at Mazzuchelli Catholic Middle School in Dubuque, Iowa. Brain Awareness Week is an international movement aimed at raising awareness about the progress and benefits of brain and nervous-system research. (Published in Print: April 6, 2011) —Jeremy Portje/Telegraph Herald/AP

    Vice President Joe Biden takes questions from a fourth grade class at the Goode Elementary School in York, Pa., on Oct. 18 during a stop to highlight the American Jobs Act. Educators and analysts are taking a hard look at whether the $55 billion K-12 portion of President Barack Obama’s nearly $450 billion jobs plan will provide the jolt to schools still feeling the pinch of a sputtering economy that the administration hopes. —Bradley C. Bower/AP

    Vice President Joe Biden takes questions from a fourth grade class at the Goode Elementary School in York, Pa., on Oct. 18 during a stop to highlight the American Jobs Act. Educators and analysts are taking a hard look at whether the $55 billion K-12 portion of President Barack Obama’s nearly $450 billion jobs plan will provide the jolt to schools still feeling the pinch of a sputtering economy that the administration hopes. —Bradley C. Bower/AP

    Pre-K student Titus Bailey waits in line for his lunch tray at West Hamlin Elementary School in West Hamlin, West Virginia, on Nov. 1. A federal spending bill includes provisions that would allow a slice of cheese pizza to count as a vegetable on school lunch trays. (Published in Print: December 7, 2011) —Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch/AP

    Pre-K student Titus Bailey waits in line for his lunch tray at West Hamlin Elementary School in West Hamlin, West Virginia, on Nov. 1. A federal spending bill includes provisions that would allow a slice of cheese pizza to count as a vegetable on school lunch trays. (Published in Print: December 7, 2011) —Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch/AP

    Radhika Lakshmi Edpuganti, 14, from Rochester, Minn., wears mismatched socks while spelling her word during round three of the National Spelling Bee in National Harbor, Md. Sukanya Roy, of South Abington Township, Pa., won the contest by spelling Cymotrichous. —Jacquelyn Martin/AP

    Radhika Lakshmi Edpuganti, 14, from Rochester, Minn., wears mismatched socks while spelling her word during round three of the National Spelling Bee in National Harbor, Md. Sukanya Roy, of South Abington Township, Pa., won the contest by spelling Cymotrichous. —Jacquelyn Martin/AP

    A Christmas tree is decorated with messages to the victims of students and teachers, killed by the March 11 tsunami at the Okawa Elemetary Scool in Ishinomaki, Miaygi Prefecture. 74 students died and remain missing nearly 9 months after the disaster. —The Yomiuri Shimbun/AP

    Happy Holidays. Thanks for dropping in.  We’ll be back next year with more great photojournalism.