• Full FrameEducation Week's Photo Blog

    ‘The Friendly School’

    by Nicole Fruge posted June 8, 2012
    Darien Zelaya, 2, clings to his mother Delkin Carcamo while she speaks with ESL parent liaison Ida White outside their trailer in Foley, Ala. Ms. White works closely with the Spanish-speaking families who live in the southern half of the 28,000-student Baldwin County school system, where Foley is located. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Darien Zelaya, 2, clings to his mother Delkin Carcamo while she speaks with ESL parent liaison Ida White outside their trailer in Foley, Ala. Ms. White works closely with the Spanish-speaking families who live in the southern half of the 28,000-student Baldwin County school system, where Foley is located. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Seven-year-old Ruby Pacheco plays outside her trailer home in Foley, Ala. Ruby is a 2nd grader at Foley Elementary School, where she tested out of the English-as-a-second-language program. Though she was born in the United States, the rest of her family is undocumented. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Seven-year-old Ruby Pacheco plays outside her trailer home in Foley, Ala. Ruby is a 2nd grader at Foley Elementary School, where she tested out of the English-as-a-second-language program. Though she was born in the United States, the rest of her family is undocumented. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Alexander Gonzalez, 8, left, talks to his brother Jairo, 11, about a homework assignment in the bedroom they share in their home in Foley, Ala. Alexander is in 2nd grade at Foley Elementary School and Jairo is in 6th grade at Foley Intermediate School. Jairo was working on questions about the book Tuck Everlasting. One question stumped him. It asked where he thought he would be in ten years. Alexander suggested a soccer star or musician. Jairo wasn't able to imagine his future. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Alexander Gonzalez, 8, left, talks to his brother Jairo, 11, about a homework assignment in the bedroom they share in their home in Foley, Ala. Alexander is in 2nd grade at Foley Elementary School and Jairo is in 6th grade at Foley Intermediate School. Jairo was working on questions about the book Tuck Everlasting. One question stumped him. It asked where he thought he would be in ten years. Alexander suggested a soccer star or musician. Jairo wasn't able to imagine his future. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Juan Pablo Pacheco, 12, cooks dinner with his mom Marietelma Ixmatlahua inside their trailer home after school in Foley, Ala. Juan Pablo is in 6th grade at Foley Intermediate School. “I honor my parents for bringing us here,” he says. “I don’t know what I would be doing over there in Mexico.”  —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Juan Pablo Pacheco, 12, cooks dinner with his mom Marietelma Ixmatlahua inside their trailer home after school in Foley, Ala. Juan Pablo is in 6th grade at Foley Intermediate School. “I honor my parents for bringing us here,” he says. “I don’t know what I would be doing over there in Mexico.” —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Lucy Cunningham, right, an ESL paraeducator at Foley Elementary, helps kindergartner Lizabeth Guerra try on pants to replace the oversized pair she wore to school while volunteer Dora Gutierrez looks on. Foley’s staff collects food and clothing for needy families, teaches adult ESL classes, and helps families translate documents.  —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Lucy Cunningham, right, an ESL paraeducator at Foley Elementary, helps kindergartner Lizabeth Guerra try on pants to replace the oversized pair she wore to school while volunteer Dora Gutierrez looks on. Foley’s staff collects food and clothing for needy families, teaches adult ESL classes, and helps families translate documents. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    April Montemayor, 8, from left, her sister Berenise Montemayor, 2, and cousin Ruben Roblero, 4, wait for a pool to fill with water as ESL parent liaison Ida White visits her mom Maria Guerra inside their trailer in Foley, Ala. April is in first grade at Foley Elementary. Ms. White was trying to get the family to take advantage of summer learning programs. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    April Montemayor, 8, from left, her sister Berenise Montemayor, 2, and cousin Ruben Roblero, 4, wait for a pool to fill with water as ESL parent liaison Ida White visits her mom Maria Guerra inside their trailer in Foley, Ala. April is in first grade at Foley Elementary. Ms. White was trying to get the family to take advantage of summer learning programs. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

     Ruby Pacheco works on homework inside her trailer home after school in Foley, Ala. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Ruby Pacheco works on homework inside her trailer home after school in Foley, Ala. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Volunteer Dora Gutierrez, a teacher and missionary from Mexico, teaches a lesson on gratitude to kindergartners in an ESL room at Foley Elementary School in Foley, Ala. The bilingual lesson exposed native English speakers to Spanish and gave ESL students a chance to share their culture with their classmates. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Volunteer Dora Gutierrez, a teacher and missionary from Mexico, teaches a lesson on gratitude to kindergartners in an ESL room at Foley Elementary School in Foley, Ala. The bilingual lesson exposed native English speakers to Spanish and gave ESL students a chance to share their culture with their classmates. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Alexander Gonzalez plays after school in his backyard in Foley, Ala. Alexander is in 2nd grade at Foley Elementary School. “It doesn’t matter that my children and I are citizens. People look at us now, see our brown skin and hear us speak Spanish, and treat us like we don’t belong here,” says Alexander's mom, Carmen Gonzalez. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Alexander Gonzalez plays after school in his backyard in Foley, Ala. Alexander is in 2nd grade at Foley Elementary School. “It doesn’t matter that my children and I are citizens. People look at us now, see our brown skin and hear us speak Spanish, and treat us like we don’t belong here,” says Alexander's mom, Carmen Gonzalez. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Juan Pablo Pacheco, center, hangs out with friends after playing basketball with a soccer ball. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Juan Pablo Pacheco, center, hangs out with friends after playing basketball with a soccer ball. —Nicole Frugé/Education Week

    Approved nearly a year ago by state lawmakers and Gov. Robert Bentley, a Republican, Alabama’s immigration law is considered the toughest in the nation. It is seen as effectively pushing undocumented immigrants from the state by curtailing many of their rights. The law makes it a criminal offense for undocumented immigrants to register a vehicle or rent an apartment, and it cracks down on anyone who employs or houses undocumented immigrants. And the state’s public schools and educators are squarely in the middle of the human fallout it has brought on.

    Foley Elementary School in Foley, Ala., began serving immigrants about 15 years ago in a summer program for the children of migrant workers who came to work the sweet-potato and watermelon harvest. For more than a decade, the school—known as escuela amistosa, or the “friendly school”— has been central to the tight-knit immigrant community.

    “I’ve told everyone who will listen that this law is wrong and it hurts children,” says William Lawrence, the longtime principal of Foley Elementary, where 20 percent of the 1,200 students are Latino, most of them American-born. “I’m a lifelong Republican, but I can’t stand by and watch as politicians try to hurt good children and families.”

    “A child who is in fear cannot learn, and that is what we are dealing with,” says Lawrence, “For the most part, these are American-citizen children whose constitutional rights are under attack by this law,” Lawrence says. “And all children, regardless of their legal status, have the right to come to school free of fear.”

    You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login | Register
    Ground Rules for Posting
    We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
    All comments are public.