• Full FrameEducation Week's Photo Blog

    A Wet Route to School

    by Swikar Patel posted August 16, 2014

    SAJANPURA VILLAGE, India (AP) — It’s a watery journey to school for 61 teenagers in part of western India. If they want to learn, they have no choice but to cross the Heran River. The trek, about 50 feet through shoulder-deep waters and then a three-mile walk, is the only practical route to their high school.

    Aruna Bariya, 14, combs her hair as she prepares to leave for school in India's Gujarat state.--Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna Bariya, 14, combs her hair as she prepares to leave for school in India’s Gujarat state.–Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna unloads dung from a trough after cleaning the buffalo shed, part of her morning chores before leaving for school.--Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna unloads dung from a trough after cleaning the buffalo shed, part of her morning chores before leaving for school.–Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna, center, and her friends walk to cross the Heran River in India's Gujarat state to get to their school located on the other side. The absence of a bridge over the river leaves Aruna and 60 other children with no choice but to swim about 15 meters (50 feet) across the shoulder-deep waters to reach the other side, where their high school is located.--Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna, center, and her friends walk to cross the Heran River in India’s Gujarat state to get to their school located on the other side. The absence of a bridge over the river leaves Aruna and 60 other children with no choice but to swim about 15 meters (50 feet) across the shoulder-deep waters to reach the other side, where their high school is located.–Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna attends school at Utavali village, across the Heran River from her home.--Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna attends school at Utavali village, across the Heran River from her home.–Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna, second left, crosses the Heran River with friends to return home after attending Utavali High School in India's  Gujarat state. The students say the swim is worth it for an education that can help lift them out of poverty in India, where at least 700 million people are living on less than $1.25 a day.--Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna, second left, crosses the Heran River with friends to return home after attending Utavali High School in India’s Gujarat state. The students say the swim is worth it for an education that can help lift them out of poverty in India, where at least 700 million people are living on less than $1.25 a day.–Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna cooks a meal after returning home from school, in India's Gujarat state.--Ajit Solanki/AP

    Aruna cooks a meal after returning home from school, in India’s Gujarat state.–Ajit Solanki/AP

     

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