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    A Look at Recruiting and Keeping Good Teachers

    by Charles Borst posted January 24, 2018
    Sarah Stucky, a history and economics teacher at Niles North High School in Skokie, Illinois., drops off her 3-year-old son Emmett Lawler at the day-care facility housed at her school. --Alyssa Schukar for Education Week

    Sarah Stucky, a history and economics teacher at Niles North High School in Skokie, Ill., drops off her 3-year-old son Emmett Lawler at the day-care facility housed at her school. –Alyssa Schukar for Education Week

    The Getting and Keeping Good Teachers report focuses on teacher shortages. An Education Week analysis of federal data finds that all 50 states and most territories reported experiencing statewide shortages in one teaching area or another for either the 2016-17 school year, the current one, or both.

    Photographers on assignment for Education Week visited school districts where different strategies for retaining and recruiting teacher are being utilized.

    On-Site Day-Care Facility
    In a bid to keep more parent-teachers in the classroom, the Niles Township district in Skokie, Ill., built a day-care center on its middle school campus in 2013 and has since expanded it to two sites serving about 80 children from birth to age 4, after more than a decade of requests from teachers and staff members.

    Kristin Delahanty brings her son Nathan, 7 months, and her daughter Norah, 4, to the Children's Learning World Montessori at Niles High School, where her husband teachers. The teachers' union and the district partnered to start the day-care program there. --Alyssa Schukar for Education Week

    Kristin Delahanty brings her son Nathan, 7 months, and her daughter Norah, 4, to the Children’s Learning World Montessori at Niles High School, where her husband teachers. The teachers’ union and the district partnered to start the day-care program there. –Alyssa Schukar for Education Week

    Sarah Stucky, a history and economics teacher at Niles North High School in Skokie, Illinois., drops off her 3-year-old son Emmett Lawler at the day-care facility housed at her school. --Alyssa Schukar for Education Week

    Sarah Stucky, a history and economics teacher at Niles North High School, drops off her 3-year-old son Emmett Lawler at the day-care facility housed at her school. –Alyssa Schukar for Education Week

    High school English teacher Ashley Amelianovich says goodbye to her son Miles, who is almost 2 years old, at the day-care center housed at her high school in Skokie, Ill. District leaders see the child-care center as a teacher-retention tool. --Alyssa Schukar for Education Week

    High school English teacher Ashley Amelianovich says goodbye to her son Miles, who is almost 2 years old, at the day-care center housed at her high school in Skokie, Ill. District leaders see the child-care center as a teacher-retention tool. –Alyssa Schukar for Education Week

    NxtGEN Teacher Residency 
    Angel Magana is studying elementary education at the University of Colorado Denver and is enrolled in the school’s NxtGEN Teacher Residency program, which allows him to work as a paid paraprofessional at a local elementary school, while working toward his teaching degree.

    Nineteen-year-old Angel Magana, is a one-on-one paraprofessional at Greenlee Elementary School in Denver, Colorado. Magana works closely with second grade student Unique Gutierrez, throughout the day with all course work.

    Nineteen-year-old Angel Magana, is a one-on-one paraprofessional at Greenlee Elementary School in Denver, Colo. Magana works closely with 2nd grade student Unique Gutierrez, throughout the day with all course work. –Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    Angel Magana, is in a Denver teacher-residency program that allows him to work as a paid paraprofessional while working toward his teaching degree. --Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    Angel Magana, is in a Denver teacher-residency program that allows him to work as a paid paraprofessional while working toward his teaching degree. –Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    Angel Magana accompanies 2nd grader Unique Gutierrez to her special education reading and math class at Greenlee Elementary school in Denver. --Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    Angel Magana accompanies 2nd grader Unique Gutierrez to her special education reading and math class at Greenlee Elementary school in Denver. –Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    --Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    Recruiting more Hispanic teachers into the classroom has been a priority for schools and districts, especially those with large populations of Hispanic students. –Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    --Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    Angel Magana hopes to be a model for other Latino men who aspire to be teachers. He’s considering becoming a principal, an administrator, even a district superintendent. –Nathan W. Armes for Education Week

    STEM Teacher Shortage 
    A persistent STEM teacher shortage in the Guilford County school system in Greensboro, N.C., led to opening the first in-house licensure program in 2008– and it’s still one of only a handful of districts across the country with such a program.

    Ashlee Clark, a chemistry teacher at Northwest Guilford High School, came to the job through Guilford county's alternative licensure program. --Justin Cook for Education Week

    Ashlee Clark, a chemistry teacher at Northwest Guilford High School in Greensboro, N.C., came to the job through Guilford county’s alternative-licensure program.  –Justin Cook for Education Week

    Ashlee Clark, a high school chemistry teacher in Greensboro, N.C., works with 10th graders Margaret Lucas, far left, and Shanna Kim. --Justin Cook for Education Week

    Ashlee Clark goes over test results with 10th graders Margaret Lucas, far left, and Shanna Kim. –Justin Cook for Education Week

    Ashlee Clark, a chemistry teacher at Northwest Guilford High School, came to the job through Guilford county's alternative licensure program. --Justin Cook for Education Week

    Ashlee Clark, a chemistry teacher in Greensboro, N.C., was doing animal research in graduate school before joining the school system as a chemistry teacher. –Justin Cook for Education Week

    Ashlee Clark works with sophomore Mary Madison Bradley during class at her Greensboro, N.C., school. --Justin Cook for Education Week

    Ashlee Clark works with sophomore Mary Madison Bradley during class at her Greensboro, N.C., school. –Justin Cook for Education Week

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