• Full FrameEducation Week's Photo Blog

    One Student’s Day at an Elite Public High School

    by Photo posted May 7, 2019

    Chicago’s selective enrollment high schools come closer to reflecting the diversity of the community than elite, admissions-based high schools in other big cities. We followed one student through her day at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, one of Chicago’s most sought-after campuses.

    Photos by: Taylor Glascock for Education Week

    Junior Rochelle Borden, 17, (right) walks with her boyfriend, Archie Grant, 17, (left) to her art class at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School Tuesday, April 30, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. The pair have been dating for two years. (Taylor Glascock/for Education Week)

    Junior Rochelle Borden, 17, (right) walks with her boyfriend, Archie Grant, 17, (left) to her art class at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School in Chicago. The pair have been dating for two years.

     

    Junior Rochelle Borden, 17, works at the main office of Whitney M. Young Magnet High School Tuesday, April 30, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. Borden spends her instructional period and her lunch working in the main office, because she wants to work there next year for her senior experience. Some of her duties include collecting visitor passes and answering phones. (Taylor Glascock/for Education Week)

    Rochelle works in the main office of Whitney Young. Rochelle spends her lunch as well as a work-study period working in the main office, because she wants to work there next year for her senior experience. Some of her duties include collecting visitor passes and answering phones.

     

    Junior Rochelle Borden, 17, (center) talks with the poetry slam team after school about what food they want to sell at an upcoming event at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School Tuesday, April 30, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. Borden is the co-captain and will be the captain her senior year. (Taylor Glascock/for Education Week)

    Rochelle talks with the poetry slam team after school about what food they want to sell at an upcoming event. She is the co-captain and will be the captain her senior year.

     

    Junior Rochelle Borden, 17, fills out a lab sheet during physics class at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School Tuesday, April 30, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. (Taylor Glascock/for Education Week)

    Rochelle fills out a lab sheet during physics class.

     

    Sculpture class at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School as photographed Tuesday, April 30, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. (Taylor Glascock/for Education Week)

    Rochelle and her classmates in sculpture class at Whitney Young.

     

    Junior Rochelle Borden, 17, (right) laughs at her partner senior Janell Nocentelli, (left) during sculpture class at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School Tuesday, April 30, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. They made a lotus flower out of found objects for an assemblage project. (Taylor Glascock/for Education Week)

    Rochelle laughs at her partner, senior Janell Nocentelli, during sculpture class. They made a lotus flower out of found objects for an assemblage project.

     

    Maria M. Cortez-Tafolla (right) helps junior Rochelle Borden (left), 17, with her resume at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School Tuesday, April 30, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. Borden spends her instructional period and her lunch working in the main office, because she wants to work there next year for her senior experience. (Taylor Glascock/for Education Week)

    Maria M. Cortez-Tafolla helps Rochelle with her resume.

     

    Junior Rochelle Borden (left), 17, says goodbye to counselor April Nicholson (right) at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School Tuesday, April 30, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. They used to hug, but Nicholson has allergies and Borden now lives with several cats, so they touch fingers instead. (Taylor Glascock/for Education Week)

    Rochelle says goodbye to school counselor April Nicholson. They used to hug, but Nicholson has allergies and Rochelle now lives with several cats, so they touch fingers instead.

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