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    Special Education in Flint, Years After the Water Crisis

    by Photo posted August 27, 2019

    By Kaitlyn Dolan

    Images by Brittany Greeson

    In the wake of the Flint, Mich., water crisis, the city has new concerns — how do they serve the influx of students in the special education system that may have been caused by elevated lead levels in the city’s water supply. Two mothers, Maxine Onstott and Ebony Dixon, have struggled to find the support their children need from the local schools.

    Photographer Brittany Greeson spent time in the Onstott and Dixon homes to capture images of life in a still recovering Flint.

    Maxine Omstott, 26, hangs out with her son, Max, 7, who is on the Autism Spectrum, at their home in Flint, Mich.

    Maxine Onstott, 26, hangs out with her son, Maximilliano, 7, who has been diagnosed on Autism Spectrum, at their home in Flint, Mich.

    Max Omstott, 7, plays at his home. Max is on the Autism spectrum and his mother has faced challenges getting the appropriate care for him through the local education system.

    Getting the appropriate services for Max through the local education system has been a challenge, according to his mother .

    Children’s drawings hang in the hallways at Educare.

    Children’s drawings hang in the hallways at Educare, one of the Flint-area preschools experiencing a surge of children with special needs.

    Ebony Dixon, 33, with her daughter, Alexus Smith, 6, right, and her son Torea Gibson, 7, left, at their home. Dixon has had difficulties getting the appropriate special education services for her two children through the public education system.

    Ebony Dixon, 33, poses with her daughter, Alexus Smith, 6, right, and her son Torea Gibson, 7, left, at their home. Like Onstott, Dixon has had difficulties getting the appropriate special education services for her two children through the public education system.

    Max Omstott, 7, plays at his home in Flint, Mich., on August 16, 2019. Max is on the Autism spectrum and his mother has faced challenges getting the appropriate care for him through the local education system.

    Max  plays in his home.

    Torea Gibson, 7, and his sister, Alexus Smith, 6, play with their drawings at their home. Their mother, Ebony Dixon, has had difficulties getting the appropriate special education services for them through the public education system.

    Torea and his sister, Alexus, play with their drawings in their home.

    A piece of paper with a sun sits on the school picture of Max Omstott.

    A school portrait of Max adorns a wall the Onstott home.

    Ebony Dixon, 33, helps her daughter, Alexus Smith, 6, put on up her shoes.

    Ebony helps Alexus put on up her shoes.

    Max Omstott, 7, touches noses while listening to music with his mom, Maxine Omstott, 26, at their home in Flint, Mich., on August 16, 2019. Max is on the Autism spectrum and his mother has faced challenges getting the appropriate care for him through the local education system.

    Max touches noses with his mom.

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