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    In Denmark, Students Go Back to School, 6 Feet Apart

    by Emma Patti Harris posted April 20, 2020

    Photos by various photographers/Ritzau Scanpix via AP

    Last week, Denmark became the first European country to allow daycare and primary schools to reopen since the start of the coronavirus lockdown. The classroom setups included desks spaced six feet apart. (In Denmark, which uses the metric system, it’s actually 1.829 meters.) One teacher at the Korshoejskolen school in Randers, Denmark, held a music lesson outdoors to maintain social distancing.

    Denmark's Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen, right, speaks to pupils during the reopening of Lykkebo School in Copenhagen, Wednesday, April 15, 2020. Denmark is beginning to relax its strict coronavirus lockdown measures by allowing some classes to return to school. (Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Denmark’s Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen, right, speaks to students during the April 15 reopening of Lykkebo School in Copenhagen.  (Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Rebekka Hjorth holds an outdoor music lesson at the Korshoejskolen in Randers, Denmark, Wednesday, April 15, 2020. (Bo Amstrup/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Rebekka Hjorth conducts an outdoor music lesson at the Korshoejskolen in Randers, Denmark, April 15, 2020. (Bo Amstrup/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Classrooms of Stengaard School are prepared for the reopening of the school after the coronavirus lockdown, in Gladsaxe, Denmark, Tuesday, April 14, 2020.(Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Some classrooms were moved into gymnasiums in order to maintain appropriate social distancing at the Stengaard Schhol in Gladsaxe, Denmark. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Principal of Stengaard School, Claus Moeller, prepares for the reopening of his school after the coronavirus lockdown, in Gladsaxe, Denmark, Tuesday April 14, 2020. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Claus Moeller, the principal of Stengaard School, prepares for the reopening of his school after the coronavirus lockdown, in Gladsaxe, Denmark. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    A general view of Stengaard School before the reopening of the school after the coronavirus lockdown. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    A sticker reading “Smiling is contagious” is seen at the playground at Stengaard School in Gladsaxe, Denmark. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Denmark's Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen, second left, speaks to pupils during the reopening of Lykkebo School in Copenhagen, Wednesday, April 15, 2020. (Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Denmark’s Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen, second left, welcomes students back to school at the reopening of Lykkebo School in Copenhagen. (Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    The playground of Stengaard School is marked for social distancing before the reopening of the school after the coronavirus lockdown, in Gladsaxe, Denmark. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    The playground of Stengaard School is marked for social distancing before the reopening of the school after the coronavirus lockdown. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Classrooms of Stengaard School are prepared for the reopening of the school after the coronavirus lockdown, in Gladsaxe, Denmark. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Classrooms at the Stengaard School are prepared for reopening after the coronavirus lockdown. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Principal of Stengaard School, Claus Moeller, prepares for the reopening of his school after the coronavirus lockdown, in Gladsaxe, Denmark. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

    Claus Moeller, the principal of Stengaard School, inspects how a classroom has been set up in the gymnasium to maintain social distancing one day before his school reopened. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

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